Libertarians Say Repeal HB2

The Libertarian Party has joined the growing list of organizations calling for the repeal of House Bill 2.

“The state has no authority to determine gender,” the unanimous resolution states. HB 2 also “unduly intrudes state authority into local decision-making and unreasonably limits the ability of the citizens … to govern themselves.”

In addition, the bill reduces individual rights because it “bans citizens from using state courts to remedy discrimination”

Nic Haag, Libertarian candidate for NC Senate 44, introduced the resolution. It was endorsed by General Assembly candidates Brad Hessel, NC Senate 15, Brian Irving, NC House 36, and Rob Rose, NC 37.

The convention was held in Raleigh last weekend.

The convention also passed a resolution calling for the repeal of the ban on counting write-in votes. The state does not count the votes for persons who haven’t gathered enough petition signatures.

This “amounts to the legislature picking and choosing which votes to count, sometimes yielding suspicious results like unanimous vote tallies in our statewide elections,” the resolutions says.

Six candidates for the Libertarian presidential nomination participated in a forum Saturday. They included former New Mexico governor Gary Johnson, the party’s 2012 standard-bearer.

In other business, the convention elected at-large members to the state executive committee and adopted a revised platform. It also selected delegates to the Libertarian National Convention and nominated presidential electors.

Read the resolutions here.

Independence Day to do list

Here are two things to do on the Fourth of July 2015, in between eating hot dogs and drinking beer, and before you watch the fireworks: 1) Read the Declaration of Independence, and; 2)  Read this excerpt from a speech by President Calvin Coolidge (you read that right) on the 150th Anniversary of the Declaration.

“The American Revolution represented the informed and mature convictions of a great mass of independent, liberty loving, God-fearing people who knew their rights, and possessed the courage to dare to maintain them.

coolidge“It was not because it was proposed to establish a new nation, but because it was proposed to establish a nation on new principles, that July 4, 1776, has come to be regarded as one of the greatest days in history …. These were the doctrine that all men are created equal, that they are endowed with certain inalienable rights, and that therefore the source of the just powers of government must be derived from the consent of the governed.

The idea that the people have a right to choose their own rulers was not new in political history. It was the foundation of every popular attempt to depose an undesirable king. This right was set out with a good deal of detail by the Dutch when as early as July 26, 1581, they declared their independence of Philip of Spain. In their long struggle with the Stuarts the British people asserted the same principles, which finally culminated in the Bill of Rights deposing the last of that house and placing William and Mary on the throne. In each of these cases sovereignty through divine right was displaced by sovereignty through the consent of the people.

“Running through the same documents, though expressed in different terms, is the clear inference of inalienable rights. But we should search these charters in vain for an assertion of the doctrine of equality. This principle had not before appeared as an official political declaration of any nation. It was profoundly revolutionary. It is one of the corner stones of American institutions.

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Legislators should uphold governor’s vetoes

by Brian Irving
Vice Chair, Libertarian Party of North Carolina

We commend Gov. Pat McCrory for courageously vetoing both Senate Bill 2 and House Bill 405 and we hope a sufficient number of state legislators have the equal courage to sustain these vetoes.

HB 405 was called the Property Protection Act, but it was clearly intended to provide cover for business owners who allowed unsafe or inhumane conditions in their businesses, and to punish anyone who took a job to expose the practices.

SB 2, with the equally disingenuous title Magistrates Recusal for Civil Ceremonies, would allow magistrates to refuse to do a job they were hired for, under the cover of claiming “any sincerely held religious objections.”

Both bills passed with bipartisan support, another proof that when it comes to expanding government power at the expense of individual liberty, both Republicans and Democrats find common ground.

Nor was either bill the result of any grassroots effort. They were pushed through a sham legislative “process” by those select few legislators and special interest groups who hold the real power in the General Assembly. What little debate there was consisted of straw-man arguments promulgated on both sides of the issue.

In short, a demonstration of everything that’s corrupt and dysfunctional in our legislative process.

Libertarians call for pardon of medical marijuana dealer

The Libertarian Party of North Carolina passed a resolution calling for the governor to pardon Todd Stimson, who was convicted of marijuana trafficking, at its annual state convention in Durham April 11-12.

Simpson openly ran a medicinal marijuana operation in Henderson County, had a business license and paid taxes on the plants he purchased. He was sentenced to up to 39 months in prison.

The resolution notes that Stimson “is a peaceful, honest family man, and has helped many in North Carolina and victimized no one” and that “no public safety interest is met by sending peaceful, honest people to prison.”

Stimson was arrested despite the fact that he’s paid for a business privilege license for the art of healing from the state Department of Revenue, has articles of incorporation from the N.C. Secretary of State explaining his business and its educational and scientific goals, and has paid for tax stamps on the plants he’s purchased.

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LP joins rally to stop NSA surveillance

Libertarian Party press release

The heroic revelations made by whistleblower Edward Snowden have let the world know: The National Security Agency is watching you and has undermined the fabric of the Internet. Its overreaching surveillance creates a climate of fear, chills free speech, and violates our basic human rights — your Fourth Amendment right to privacy.

But a movement is building to change all this.

stop_watching_us_logoThe Libertarian Party was among the first groups to join a growing coalition of organizations operating under the umbrella Stop Watching Us, which aims to stop the NSA’s mass surveillance of Americans.

The coalition will hold a rally in Washington, D.C., Oct. 26, 2013, on the 12th anniversary of the signing of the Patriot Act. Thousands of people from across the political spectrum are expected to unite in Washington, D.C., to demand: Stop watching us.

Speakers at the rally will include 2012 Libertarian presidential candidate Gov. Gary Johnson. A march before the rally, music, and other festivities are planned for the day.

Show your determination to stop government surveillance and come to Washington, D.C., on Oct. 26. For more details about the rally, visit: https://rally.stopwatching.us/

Visit LP.org to share this with your friends!

Tom Woods to headline Nullify Now NC conference

Thomas E. Woods, Jr., an historian and best-selling author of the book “Nullification: How to Resist Federal Tyranny in the 21st Century,” will give the keynote speech at the Nullify Now! Conference in Raleigh October 19 at the Raleigh Convention Center.

The Tenth Amendment Center has been hosting events around the country to educate and activate people on the topic of Nullification since September 2012. At a Nullify Now! event, you learn nullification’s constitutional basis and when it has been used in history.

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Libertarians oppose more restrictions on right to vote

by J.J. Summerell
Chair, Libertarian Party of North Carolina

Republicans claim to be the party of limited government. Now we see what that term really means: when Republicans say limited government, they apparently mean government limited to them and their supporters.

Just when it didn’t seem possible that North Carolina’s election laws could get more restrictive, the Republican majority has come up with a massive bill (HB 589) that would make it even harder for people to vote.

Using the excuse that they are trying to combat voter fraud, the Republicans want to perpetrate an even greater fraud on North Carolina voters under the guise of restoring “confidence in government.”

Republicans claim to be the party of limited government. Now we see what that term really means: when Republicans say limited government, they apparently mean government limited to them and their supporters.

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No Indefinite Detention

Congress has a chance to partially atone for their trashing of our rights this week when a bill to amend the National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2013 comes up for consideration in the House of Representatives.  The NDAA past last year contained two controversial and unconstitutional detention provisions that allow for the indefinite detention of American citizens and resident aliens arrested on U.S. soil.

The Campaign for Liberty, and other civil libertarian groups, are urging people to contact their Congress person to urge them mitigate this outrage by getting rid of these provisions or else voting “no” on H.R. 4310, the FY 2013 NDAA.

Reps. Adam Smith and Justin Amash are proposing an amendment to the NDAA to make it clear that it does not authorize indefinite detention of American citizens or legal residents.

You can contact Rep. Renee Ellmers here (she doesn’t have a direct email listed) or call her Washington office at (202) 225-4531 or the district office in Dunn at (910)230-1910, Toll Free 1-877-645-8764.

Note: If you are one of her “new” constituents (under the new district maps),  you can’t use the contact form. It’s still based on the old district. You’ll have to call.

I just called her D.C. office, let them know who I was, and asked her to vote yes on the amendment!

If I were in Congress, I would not only vote yes on this amendment, and no on the bill if the amendment does not pass, I would not have voted for the 2012 NDAA in the first place.

Amendment One Isn’t

Apparently the state constitutional amendment regarding marriage will not be called Amendment One when it appears on the ballot. According to this story in the News & Observer it does not have an official name, and probably will just be called a “constitutional amendment” on the ballot.

That’s just one of the confusing (on purpose?) aspects of this issue. As the story notes, people who say they’ll vote for the amendment in polls change their minds when the find out what it actually means.

But that’s what happens in a “democracy,” the majority gets to tell you what your rights are.

N.C. Libertarians Oppose Amendment One

The North Carolina Libertarian Party unanimously passed a resolution opposing the proposed state constitutional amendment to ban gay marriage at its annual convention held Saturday in Durham. Rather than fulfilling the “great value” of a constitution, which is to protect individual rights, the amendment would deny rights to segment of the population and discriminate against a minority.

The Libertarians not only urged voters to defeat the amendment, which will be on the May 8 primary ballot, they also encouraged those planning marriage to “shun and disparage the licensure of the state,” in other words to not get a state marriage license. “A free and proud people do not ask the State for permission to marry,” the resolution says.

The resolution also reiterates the party platform plank calling for repeal of marriage license laws altogether to honor the principle that “couples are married when they declare they are.”

The party is a member of the Coalition to Protect North Carolina Families working to defeat the amendment, know as Amendment One. It would define marriage between a man and women as the only “domestic legal union” recognized by state law.

The resolution also asserts the amendment would violate the U.S. Constitution’s prohibition against impairing the obligation of contracts for many couples married in other states.” In addition, the amendment advances “no legitimate governmental interest” and is so vaguely worded that “no one can predict the scope of its harm.”

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