Mike Beitler's New Year's Resolutions

News release from the Mike Beitler for U.S. Senate campaign

Mike Beitler didn’t have much trouble coming up with his New Year’s Resolutions. Ever since he announced he was seeking the Libertarian nomination for U.S. Senate, he knew he’d be spending most of the new year earning the confidence and the vote of his fellow North Carolinians.

“In 2010, I’ll be devoting my time and energy convincing the people of North Carolina that it is time for them to reassert their liberty and to send a libertarian to represent them in the U.S. Senate.,” Beitler said.

“So these – my New Year’s Resolutions – represent my pledge and my promise to the people of North Carolina:

“First, I always vote in favor of the Constitution of the United States and the Constitution of North Carolina. Every issue. Every time. Every issue. No exceptions. No excuses.

“Second, I will continue to oppose any and all efforts by the federal government to act beyond its Constitutional authority.

“Third, I will introduce, sponsor, and support legislation to repeal laws and regulations that are outside the scope of the powers delegated by the people to the federal government.

“Fourth, I will only vote in favor of a bill that I have thoroughly read, considered and understood.

“Fifth, I will be accountable to voters. I will make public every vote I cast while in office.”

“These may seem like radical concepts,” Beitler said. “But the only seem radical because the Democrats and Republicans who’ve dominated our state’s politics for so long have befuddled people into thinking that government was the solution to all their problems.”

“It is not.”

“The time has come to stop talking in terms of reducing the budgets of various government programs and agencies,” Beitler said. “The time has come to abolish entire Federal programs and agencies. That’s why I am running for U.S. Senate.”

 

Liberals comment on the health care ‘reform’ bill

“It’s a seriously flawed bill, we’ll spend years if not decades fixing it, but it’s nonetheless a huge step forward.” (Paul Krugman,  NYTimes columnist)

“How do you applaud while holding your nose? … There is so much that is wrong with it — and the way it was made — and, at the same time, so much that is right that you just have to shake your head in despair and in wonder.” (David Broder, Washington Post columnist)

Liberals comment on the health care 'reform' bill

“It’s a seriously flawed bill, we’ll spend years if not decades fixing it, but it’s nonetheless a huge step forward.” (Paul Krugman,  NYTimes columnist)

“How do you applaud while holding your nose? … There is so much that is wrong with it — and the way it was made — and, at the same time, so much that is right that you just have to shake your head in despair and in wonder.” (David Broder, Washington Post columnist)

Rx for health care = liberty

Excessive government regulation which drives up the cost of drugs and restricts the number of health care professionals allowed to practice, and out-of-control malpractice suits are the cause of the health care crisis, according to Dr. Mary Ruwart.

“Clearly, lowering health care spending by doing away with wasteful practices should be at the top of our health care reform list,” write Ruwart.  Read more here.

Some politicians should just go … permanently

It took the Wake County Commissioners three days to elect a new chair and vice-chair. Democratic county commissioners should heed the advice of one of their own: “If you can’t stand the heat, stay out of the kitchen” (Harry Truman). They act as if they are owed special consideration for their service on the commission.

Betty Lou Ward thinks she earned the right to come and go as she pleases during meetings because she’s served on the board for 21 years. Apparently, in all that time she never knew if you left a meeting and there was a vote, your vote was recorded as a yes.

Stan Norwalk thinks the commission should offer him special privileges because of his illness. It was, after all, a pre-existing condition.

This 3-3 deadlock that prevented the board from electing a chair exists because one Democratic member, Harold Webb, has been unable to attend meetings since September because of illness.

Webb finally should up for the meeting today, via telephone, and the board elected Betty Ward vice-chair, voting (surprise) along straight party lines.

And they have the audacity to call themselves “public servants.” However well meaning they may be, good intentions are no substitute for actions. In a republic, elected leaders are the equals, not the superiors, of the electorate.

By acting as privileged persons, elected officials demean themselves and the position they hold, and ill serve the taxpayers.

Unfortunately, this is all to common behavior for elected officials. They moan about how hard their job is, how difficult the decisions are they must make, and how they are only raising your taxes, or outlawing yet another human action for your own good.

Before you write an irate comment that I’m against old people and the ill. I remind you that I am 61 and know what if feels like sitting through an interminable meeting when you have to go.

Shall we get serious

Government is the art of keeping people from meddling in their own business – Francoise Girould

Commenting on an earlier post “How serious is the Libertarian Party about being taken seriously,” Richard Evey said, “I will get back to you on this.” He did, ending with this quote. Giroud was, of a former French minister of women’s equality. Ah, the French!

Here’s Richard’s reply …

Continue reading

Election reform groups join Libertarian appeal

The Libertarian Party of North Carolina has filed a formal appeal of the N.C. Appeals Court in its lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of N.C.’s electoral laws, according to an announcement from Barbara Howe, LPNC state chair.

“Happily, several  friendly organizations are planning to file amicus briefs in support of our actions,” said Howe. These include Common Cause, Democracy NC, FairVote, Free & Equal, the John Locke Foundation, the League of Women Voters of NC,  the NC Institution for Constitutional Law, North Carolinians for Free and Proper Elections, the NC Center for Voter Education and the Southern Coalition for Social Justice.

The appeal was filed November 23. Howe said they do not know when the full court will hear the case. For background on the lawsuit, go here.

Howe also announced the LPNC appointed Matt Reeps of Charlotte to serve as Political Director.

Introducing the new Raleigh Libertarian Examiner

No, that doesn’t mean I’m going to be examining libertarians. I’ve joined the staff of Examiner.com as the Raleigh Libertarian Examiner, so I’ll be examining and writing about local news, current events and politics from a libertarian perspective.

Examiner.com is an online news service, not a blog. That means I’ve taken my “objective journalist” skills out of mothballs and will be putting them to use again. Meanwhile, I’ll keep my personal opinion stuff confined to this blog. Whatever I write for Examiner.com will also be posted here, but not necessarily vice versa.

What is Examiner.com (from their website)

Launched in April 2008, Examiner.com is the insider source of everything local, offering a rich mix of hyper-local and globally relevant content. Examiner.com covers more than 100 major U.S. cities, thousands of towns and neighborhoods, and is developing a strong presence in international markets including Canada, the U.K., the Philippines and Australia. Website visitors are geo-targeted to their closest market, with over 18 million monthly unique visitors expected by the end of 2009.

Examiner.com is a division of the Clarity Media Group, and is wholly owned by The Anschutz Company, one of the largest media investment companies in the world. Examiner.com is also fortunate to have insiders from sister company AEG, the world’s largest owner of sports teams and events, examining content from within their respective festival, venue, sports arena, team or special event.